Impressionist-inspired Laguna, in memory of Vincent van Gogh

Happy Birthday Vincent van Gogh ~

Having just returned from a visit to the US West Coast, I’ve been looking through my photos and was inspired to pay homage to the great Dutch post-Impressionist artist (30 March 1853-29 July 1890) by sharing with you one of my favourites.

Let me preface this by way of a bit of an explanation:

Van Gogh’s most notable works were painted after he’d discovered the works of the Impressionists in Paris, around 1886. Subsequently, he left for the south of France in hopes of establishing a community of artists in the city of Arles.

Captivated by the clarity of light and the vibrant colors of the Provençal spring, Van Gogh produced fourteen paintings of orchards in less than a month, painting outdoors and varying his style and technique. ~ metmuseum.org

It was during this time that he produced a number of masterpieces including Still Life: Vase with Twelve Sunflowers (1888), The Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum, Arles, at Night (1888), Starry Night Over the Rhone (1888), Arles: View from the Wheat Fields (1888), and Still Life: Vase with Oleanders and Books. The latter may be viewed at NYC’s Met Museum of Art.

In the same vein, Laguna’s art scene evolved primarily during the early 1900’s, when artist Norman St Clair moved to the area and attracted an artist-following. Influenced by French Impressionism, the community became known as the ‘open air school’ as they found inspiration in the midst of Laguna’s landscape – rugged terrain, wild colourful flora, sunlight, and sweeping ocean vistas.

This is a photo I took of the fog unfurling over the Pacific Ocean, near Laguna’s Crescent Bay Point Park. In the background, the bark of seals could be heard though they were a sight unseen; a view obstructed by the thick mist and uneven rocky faced cliffs.

It was one of the most beautiful moments of the trip, and I hope you’ll enjoy the image.

If you hear a voice within you that says “you cannot paint”; by all means paint and that voice will be silenced. ~ Vincent Van Gogh